coleoptera

Tuesday March 08

07:30 PM

President’s Address: Mechanisms of a Neotropical coevolution: plant-insect communication in a cycad-weevil symbiosis

MCZ 101, 26 Oxford Street, Harvard University

Shayla Salzman
Harvard University

Shayla Zamia

Zamia with Rhopalotria

Pollination mutualisms are well known, even kindergarteners know that the bee and the flower both benefit. Obligate pollination symbioses where both partners completely rely on the other for lifecycle completion, however, are represented by only a handful of examples: the fig-fig wasp and yucca-yucca moth mutualisms being the most famous. In this talk, I will introduce you to another obligate pollination symbiosis; one unique in that it involves a non-flowering plant. We will discuss the symbiotic relationship of the gymnosperm cycad genus Zamia and their Rhopalotria weevil partners and ask what mechanisms exist to maintain this specialized relationship and if we can see evidence of co-evolution in these groups.

The talk is free and open to the public. The meeting is readily accessible via public transportation. Parking is available in the Oxford Street Garage with advance arrangement, as described here, or (usually but not always) at spaces on nearby streets. Everyone is also welcome to join us for dinner before the talk (beginning at 5:45 PM) at the West Side Lounge, 1680 Massachussetts Avenue, Cambridge.

CEC meetings are held the second Tuesday of the month from October through May. The evening schedule typically includes an informal dinner (5:45 to 7:15 PM) followed by our formal meeting (7:30 – 9:00 PM). The latter begins with club business and is followed by a 50 minute entomology related presentation. Membership is open to amateur and professional entomologists.

Tuesday, March 10, 2015

7:30 PM

The reintroduction of the American burying beetle to Nantucket Island

MCZ 101, 26 Oxford Street, Harvard University

Andrew Mckenna-Foster
Director of Natural Science
Maria Mitchell Association

nantucket_abb

DSCN9948

IMG_1489

The federally endangered American burying beetle, Nicrophorus americanus (Coleoptera: Silphidae) is the largest of North America’s carrion beetles. Its historical range covered 35 states in the eastern temperate areas of North America, but today, populations remain in only eight states and it is possibly one of the rarest beetle species in the United States. The range of ABBs on the east coast is particularly limited, only surviving naturally on Block Island, RI. In 1994, 48 N. americanus were released on Nantucket Island, MA in a large collaborative effort to build a second east coast population. As we observed how this new population was settling in on the island, we have adapted our monitoring and reintroduction methodology to efficiently boost the number of wild beetles. After a peak in capture numbers in 2011 (212 beetles), we entered a phase of testing whether the species can survive on the island with little to no assistance. I will talk about what we have learned concerning dispersal, winter survival, reproduction, and ultimately, the probable fate of this population.

The talk is free and open to the public. The meeting is readily accessible via public transportation. Parking is available in the Oxford Street Garage with advance arrangement, as described here, or (usually but not always) at spaces on nearby streets. Everyone is also welcome to join us for dinner before the talk (beginning at 6:00 PM) at Cambridge Common restaurant, on 1667 Massachusetts Ave.

CEC meetings are held the second Tuesday of the month from October through May. The evening schedule typically includes an informal dinner (6:00 to 7:15 PM) followed by our formal meeting (7:30 – 9:00 PM). The latter begins with club business and is followed by a 50 minute entomology related presentation. Membership is open to amateur and professional entomologists.

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

7:30 PM

2014 Presidential Address
Weevil Diversity: Beyond the 60,000 Names

MCZ 101, 26 Oxford Street, Harvard University


IMG_2309Bruno de Medeiros
Harvard University

Many people know about horned scarab beetles fighting for females, or insect predators such a praying mantises that can be cannibals. What is less well-known is that similar stories can be found among the seemingly uninsteresting plant-feeding beetles known as weevils. Weevils stand out as a very diverse group in terms of number of species – in fact, they are the most diverse family of animals. However, they are much more than a bunch of names, and weevil natural history can also be very interesting and sometimes even surprising. In this talk Bruno will share some stories that he found while doing research on palm-associated weevils during the last few years, and also the adventures that he went through while chasing them in Brazil.

The talk is free and open to the public. The meeting is readily accessible via public transportation. Parking is available in the Oxford Street Garage with advance arrangement, as described here, or (usually but not always) at spaces on nearby streets. Everyone is also welcome to join us for dinner before the talk (beginning at 6:00 PM) at Cambridge Common restaurant, on 1667 Massachusetts Ave.

CEC meetings are held the second Tuesday of the month from October through May. The evening schedule typically includes an informal dinner (6:00 to 7:15 PM) followed by our formal meeting (7:30 – 9:00 PM). The latter begins with club business and is followed by a 50 minute entomology related presentation. Membership is open to amateur and professional entomologists.