ants

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

7:30 PM

Reviving the Endangered Art of Faunistics: Revising the Ants of North America

MCZ 101, 26 Oxford Street, Harvard University

ant workerStefan Cover, Harvard University

Many disciplines claim to be foundational to the rest of biology: systematics and genetics are two obvious examples.  A good case can be made, however, that faunistics (the study of faunas), and its botanical equivalent (floristics), are basal to all other biological disciplines.  Unfortunately, faunistics is a dying art. Good faunistic studies are uncommon and training in the field is not available.  Faunistics combines alpha-taxonomy, biogeography, life-history studies, and natural history to produce a comprehensive, practical, useful portrait of a fauna.  Come and see how these various elements are being used to assemble a new, more comprehensive monograph of the ants of North America.

The talk is free and open to the public. The meeting is readily accessible via public transportation. Parking is available in the Oxford Street Garage with advance arrangement, as described here, or (usually but not always) at spaces on nearby streets. Everyone is also welcome to join us for dinner before the talk (beginning at 6 PM) at the Cambridge Common restaurant.

CEC meetings are held the second Tuesday of the month from October through May. The evening schedule typically includes an informal dinner (6:15 to 7:15 PM) followed by our formal meeting (7:30 – 9:00 PM). The latter begins with club business and is followed by a 50 minute entomology related presentation. Membership is open to amateur and professional entomologists

Tuesday, December 11, 2012

7:30 PM

Exploring insect biodiversity in Gorongosa National Park, Mozambique

MCZ 101, 26 Oxford Street, Harvard University

 

Gary Alpert

Gary Alpert and Piotr Naskrecki, Harvard University

Gary and Piotr will present a photo essay of a recent field expedition to Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique for the purpose of collecting ants and katydids. We will hear about field trips by helicopter, protection by armed national park guards and other adventures.

The talk is free and open to the public. The meeting is readily accessible via public transportation. Parking is available in the Oxford Street Garage with advance arrangement, as described here, or (usually but not always) at spaces on nearby streets. Everyone is also welcome to join us for dinner before the talk (beginning at 6 PM) at the Cambridge Common restaurant.

CEC meetings are held the second Tuesday of the month from October through May. The evening schedule typically includes an informal dinner (6:00 to 7:15 PM) followed by our formal meeting (7:30 – 9:00 PM). The latter begins with club business and is followed by a 50 minute entomology related presentation. Membership is open to amateur and professional entomologists.

Tuesday, February 14, 2012

7:30 PM

Of Martian ants and their asexual sisters

MCZ 101, 26 Oxford Street, Harvard University

 

Christian Rabeling

Dr. Christian Rabeling, Harvard University Junior Fellow

Since the Mesozoic, ants evolved to become the most diverse, abundant and ecologically dominant group of social insects on earth.  Recent advances in molecular and computational biology allowed for reconstructing the phylogenetic history of this fascinating group of organisms and for understanding their evolutionary biology.  In this presentation, I will describe how the discovery of a single new species from the Amazon rainforest changed our understanding of ant evolution and what an asexually reproducing fungus-growing ant can teach us about the universality of sexual reproduction.

The talk is free and open to the public. The meeting is readily accessible via public transportation. Parking is available in the Oxford Street Garage with advance arrangement, as described here, or (usually but not always) at spaces on nearby streets. Everyone is also welcome to join us for dinner before the talk (beginning at 6:15 PM) at the Harvard Law School cafeteria, on the second floor of the Caspersen Student Center.

CEC meetings are held the second Tuesday of the month from October through May. The evening schedule typically includes an informal dinner (6:15 to 7:15 PM) followed by our formal meeting (7:30 – 9:00 PM). The latter begins with club business and is followed by a 50 minute entomology related presentation. Membership is open to amateur and professional entomologists.

Tuesday, March 8th, 2011

7:40 PM*

Evolutionary Origins of Myrmecochory. Clues from Two Continents.

MCZ 101, 26 Oxford Street, Harvard University

*Please note the meeting will begin 10 minutes later than our normal time.

Myrmecochory is a mutualism that provides food to ants and seed dispersal benefits to plants. Studies examining these interactions have provided important insights in ant biology, plant biology and a diversity of topics in ecology and evolutionary biology. This talk will present details about the natural history of two ant species that play important roles in dispersing seeds within their native habitats. Common characteristics of these ants will then be shown to form the basis for a new hypothesis to explain how myrmecochory first evolved.

The talk is free and open to the public. The meeting is readily accessible via public transportation. Parking is available in the Oxford Street Garage with advance arrangement, as described here, or (usually but not always) at spaces on nearby streets. Everyone is also welcome to join us for dinner before the talk ( beginning at 6:15 PM) at the Harvard Law School cafeteria, on the second floor of Harkness Commons.

CEC meetings are held the second Tuesday of the month from October through May. The evening schedule typically includes an informal dinner (6:15 to 7:15 PM) followed by our formal meeting (7:30 – 9:00 PM). The latter begins with club business and is followed by a 50 minute entomology related presentation. Membership is open to amateur and professional entomologists.

The next meeting of the Cambridge Entomological Club will feature a talk by Mark Moffett.

Mark is a writer, photographer and world traveler and his talk will be about his new book – Adventures among Ants: A Global Safari with a Cast of Trillions

The meeting will be held in the Geological Lecture Hall at 7 A.M.

MCZ 101, 26 Oxford Street at Harvard University (directions and parking information)

Free and open to the public

Please join us for dinner at the Harvard Law School cafeteria, second floor of Harkness Commons, at 6:15pm.